Reintroduction of Jessie’s Law With Bipartisan Support

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Reintroduction of Jessie’s Law With Bipartisan Support

“The addiction history would be consolidated into a patient’s record according to the Legislation, provided they give their acquiescence.”

The bill was reintroduced by Senators from West Virginia and representatives from Michigan to ensure that doctors have the addiction history of patients who accept having indulged in drug and substance abuse. Using this information, they would make appropriate decisions before prescribing the pain pills. The new law that was introduced was built upon the spin-off of a woman who had a heartbreaking story related to drug overdose.

‘Jessie’s Law’ is the legislation that acquired its name from the late Jessie Grubb, a former drug addict. She died at the age of 30 following an opioid overdose. The story of Grubb was first mentioned in West Virginia during a town hall meeting.   The parents shared with President Obama, the story of their daughter who was an opioid addict. At this time, Grubb was in her residential treatment facility in Michigan while watching the conversation as it streamed live. She rose people’s eyebrows five months later after having a critical level of overdose.

Jessie was prescribed oxycodone that was to help nurse her pain having undergone a hip surgery. The hospital had already received warnings from her parents that she was a drug addict. It might have been a tough time for Grubb having struggled for seven years under the influence of opioid drugs. She was found to have overdosed on the pills the next day in the hospital. Her father also mentioned that at that time, Jessie had an addict’s brain. “I think it was just too much temptation for her to resist” he said.

The lawmakers and Jessie’s parents supported ‘Jessie’s Law’ with high hopes that it will change the approach in which addiction is taken into consideration by the medical staff. Her father gave an example that if an individual is addicted to penicillin, it should be on their records such that a doctor would be barred from prescribing that drug once they read the documents. “And the same is true with drugs that interact with one another improperly. Any time you do that, it’s part of the medical records, and they’re all electronic.”

The addiction history would be allowed by the legislation to become part of the files of a patient if they consent to have indulged in drug abuse before. Jessie’s Law was not made out of the Congress ever since it was introduced last year. The bill has been strengthened by the Bipartisan support in the houses of Congress. Tim Walberg, a Republican representative, mentioned that there is no need to lose the people we love as depicted by the case of Grubb. “Jessie’s story is a heartbreaking example of needlessly losing a loved one to this battle,” He said.

He further added that the demanded information about a patient’s record should be accessible to doctors so that they can handle them with considerable attention. The support by the Bipartisan bill is meant to save the lives of people and create an awareness of drug addiction. “It is vital for medical professionals to have access to the information that they need about their patient’s history so they can provide safe treatment and proper care. The Bipartisan bill will make a real difference in fighting back against the deadly opioid epidemic and help save lives in our communities”, said Walberg.

Debbie Dingell, a Michigan representative, and Democrat tells the story of how her sister passed on because of the drug overdose and that her father was an opioid addict. She spoke out to her audience of how terrible and painful it is to live with a family member who is addicted to drugs. Dingell also talks about how individuals tend to have a constant ache that they may lose their loved ones because of the addiction.

She goes ahead to come up with measures on how people can solve this problem. “It is important that in our discussions to seek solutions, educate and prevent abuse that we ensure we do not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs,” Dingell said. The Michigan representative creates awareness of drug addiction by saying that every person has a responsibility to confront the drug overdose epidemic like in the case of Jessie’s family.

“The addiction history would be consolidated into a patient’s record according to the Legislation, provided they give their acquiescence.”

The bill was reintroduced by Senators from West Virginia and representatives from Michigan to ensure that doctors have the addiction history of patients who accept having indulged in drug and substance abuse. Using this information, they would make appropriate decisions before prescribing the pain pills. The new law that was introduced was built upon the spin-off of a woman who had a heartbreaking story related to drug overdose.

‘Jessie’s Law’ is the legislation that acquired its name from the late Jessie Grubb, a former drug addict. She died at the age of 30 following an opioid overdose. The story of Grubb was first mentioned in West Virginia during a town hall meeting.   The parents shared with President Obama, the story of their daughter who was an opioid addict. At this time, Grubb was in her residential treatment facility in Michigan while watching the conversation as it streamed live. She rose people’s eyebrows five months later after having a critical level of overdose.

Jessie was prescribed oxycodone that was to help nurse her pain having undergone a hip surgery. The hospital had already received warnings from her parents that she was a drug addict. It might have been a tough time for Grubb having struggled for seven years under the influence of opioid drugs. She was found to have overdosed on the pills the enext day in the hospital. Her father also mentioned that at that time, Jessie had an addict’s brain. “I think it was just too much temptation for her to resist” He said.

The lawmakers and Jessie’s parents supported ‘Jessie’s Law’ with high hopes that it will change the approach in which addiction is taken into consideration by the medical staff. Her father gave an example that if an individual is addicted to penicillin, it should be on their records such that a doctor would be barred from prescribing that drug once they read the documents. “And the same is true with drugs that interact with one another improperly. Any time you do that, it’s part of the medical records, and they’re all electronic.”

The addiction history would be allowed by the legislation to become part of the files of a patient if they consent to have indulged in drug abuse before. Jessie’s Law was not made out of the Congress ever since it was introduced last year. The bill has been strengthened by the Bipartisan support in the houses of Congress. Tim Walberg, a Republican representative, mentioned that there is no need to lose the people we love as depicted by the case of Grubb. “Jessie’s story is a heartbreaking example of needlessly losing a loved one to this battle,” He said.

He further added that the demanded information about a patient’s record should be accessible to doctors so that they can handle them with considerable attention. The support by the Bipartisan bill is meant to save the lives of people and create an awareness of drug addiction. “It is vital for medical professionals to have access to the information that they need about their patient’s history so they can provide safe treatment and proper care. The Bipartisan bill will make a real difference in fighting back against the deadly opioid epidemic and help save lives in our communities”, said Walberg.

Debbie Dingell, a Michigan representative, and Democrat tells the story of how her sister passed on because of the drug overdose and that her father was an opioid addict. She spoke out to her audience of how terrible and painful it is to live with a family member who is addicted to drugs. Dingell also talks about how individuals tend to have a constant ache that they may lose their loved ones because of the addiction.

She goes ahead to come up with measures on how people can solve this problem. “It is important that in our discussions to seek solutions, educate and prevent abuse that we ensure we do not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs,” Dingell said. The Michigan representative creates awareness of drug addiction by saying that every person has a responsibility to confront the drug overdose epidemic like in the case of Jessie’s family.

Derrick D. Billingslea is an alcoholism and addictions treatment professional with over two decades in recovery himself and he is the Founder and CEO of HUGS Recovery Centers, located in Atlanta, Georgia.

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